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theexorcist:

Director William Friedkin takes a moment between takes to strike a pose for the camera as the statue of Pazuzu looms in the background, during filming of the exorcism sequence on the set of The Exorcist.

theexorcist:

Director William Friedkin takes a moment between takes to strike a pose for the camera as the statue of Pazuzu looms in the background, during filming of the exorcism sequence on the set of The Exorcist.

I wish I had the time or motivation to write a review of Munchie.

amazonstudios:

Have you seen Kubrick’s top 10?

In 1963, Stanley Kubrick created a list of the greatest films of all time. It has recently resurfaced, and is worth checking out:

  1. I Vitelloni (dir. Federico Fellini, 1953)
  2. Wild Strawberries (dir. Ingmar Bergman, 1957)
  3. Citizen Kane (dir. Orson Welles, 1941)
  4. The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (dir. John Huston, 1948)
  5. City Lights (dir. Charlie Chaplin, 1931)
  6. Henry V (dir. Laurence Olivier, 1944)
  7. La Notte (dir. Michelangelo Antonioni, 1961)
  8. The Bank Dick (dir. Edward F. Cline, 1940)
  9. Roxie Hart (dir. William A. Wellman, 1942)
  10. Hell’s Angels (dir. Howard Hughes, 1930)

Find details, and links to more of the greatest movies of all time here.

A Nightmare On Boredom Street

I just watched the remake of “A Nightmare on Elm Street” for the second time. I realized that I hadn’t remembered a single thing about it, despite having watched it when it was released to DVD.

That should’ve been my first clue, but I decided to give it another chance with a fresh perspective. I don’t know why I like to torture myself, but often find myself revisiting shitty remakes of the movies I love. TCM, Halloween. Friday. Even The Shining. They always make me appreciate the real ones even more.

While many remakes piss me off, I’m not necessarily opposed to them in general. What pisses me off is when it’s clearly done for money alone with little regard for the source, as must have been the case with Nightmare.

As far as I can tell, the formula for remaking this film was to rip scenes from the original, make them far less effective, make the effects look thirty times faker, despite thirty years of technological advancements, make the characters far duller, and supplement with remarkably unremarkable scenes, dream sequences and non-scares.

And for what? A few bucks and a defiled legacy? Shitty sequels are one thing, but if you’re going to take a classic’s name, and try to claim it and start over, you better at least come up with something interesting. Nobody expects you to top the source, but at least do something people will enjoy for years as a separate entity rather than something that’s just going to irritate.

Sure, art is subjective, but if you’re going to make art, make something that’s fucking original or at least is an attempt at something original. And believe it or not, this has been done with remakes. A bunch of times. Even if it doesn’t turn out great, you get bonus points for at least trying to do something creative (see Rob Zombie’s Halloween - I have plenty of beefs with this movie, but at least he did something unique with it).

Platinum Dunes (which sadly gets the privilege of introducing new people to classic franchises), I’m looking in your direction.

And for fuck’s sake, throw in some entertaining characters every once in a while.

I also say this with the fact that PD is preparing to do another Friday film (psst…you’re way over-producing these things.).

amazonstudios:

Movie Moments: Alfred Hitchcock’s The Birds

"I have never known birds of different species to flock together. The very concept is unimaginable. Why, if that happened, we wouldn’t stand a chance! How could we possibly hope to fight them?"

ifc:

Happy 4th. Go red, white and blue yourself.

ifc:

Happy 4th. Go red, white and blue yourself.